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Food Policy Resources

Please contact Anne Palmer at apalmer6@jhu.edu or Karen Bassarab at kbanks10@jhu.edu if you are looking for specific materials.

Showing 21 - 40 of 418 results

Photo: Apples and Equity

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Piedmont Triad Regional Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

The Piedmont Triad Regional Food Council began 2020 engaged in the process of conducting a regional food assessment for the twelve counties of the Piedmont Triad with equity as a central component. On March 19, 2020, North Carolina instituted its first statewide lockdown in response to the COVID-19 crisis. In-person outreach was canceled, and we pivoted to online surveying and community engagement. In early fall, we were able to safely attend outdoor farmers markets and grocery stores to conduct additional survey outreach. As an incentive for survey participation, we offered apples sourced from local farms and a sticker designed in collaboration with the council marketing workgroup that says "Care About Food Equity in the Triad".

Image credit: Jennifer Bedrosian; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Bag Lady

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Johns Hopkins University
Publication Type
Photo

Volunteers sorting and packing emergency food bags for Johns Hopkins employees in need.

Image credit: Brent Kim; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Berry Time

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Schumacher Center for New Economics
Publication Type
Photo

The Schumacher Center for a New Economics, located amidst the rolling hills of the Berkshire region of Western Massachusetts, dedicates its efforts toward building a regenerative economy based on the health and robustness of local economies. In this spirit, it advocates for the use of collective land ownership models like Community Land Trusts, the rematriation of lands to indigenous ownership, and land gifting as a form of reparations to communities of color. The organization advocates for these models not only because decommodifying land, water, and air sustains communities in an equitable fashion, but also because removing land from the speculative market and placing it in community control liberates small-scale farmers to farm regeneratively over decades, rather than focusing simply on the quickest way to turn a profit from the soil using monoculture or extractive methods. 

The Schumacher Center itself sits on land that belongs to a Community Land Trust; the orchard it overlooks and the garden one of its leaseholders (and the organization's founder) cultivates epitomizes the ecological imperatives of liberating the land for sustainable, gentle cultivation practices. Here, raspberry-picking season is featured in several stages: the height of summertime's abundance, the collection of its fruits, and preservation in jam jars to be enjoyed for months to come.

Image credit: Brittany Ebeling; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Butterkin Squash Harvest at the Arma Community Garden

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Live Well Crawford County
Publication Type
Photo

What do you do when someone donates squash transplants to a community garden even though the donor isn't sure what kind of seed they started? Plant them anyway! Volunteers at the Arma Nutrition Council's community garden had no idea the transplants were a cross between pumpkin and butternut squash. That didn't matter in the end because the butterkin pies that were made from the harvests were delicious. The resident-led community garden in the background, which is located in a city park, grew approximately one ton of fresh food that was given away for free through the Arma City Library's food pantry. This community of 1,400 Kansans is nearly 10 miles away from any other sources of fresh produce.

Image credit: Matt O'Malley; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Cat Among Kale

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Johns Hopkins University
Publication Type
Photo

Our cat, Lavey (short for Lavender Anne), was in dire need of a nail trim. On our way home from the vet, we decided to take a quick detour to San Jacinto Community Garden‚ one of our favorite destinations to get outside and tend to our little veggie plot during COVID-19. Lavey loves exploring the outdoors, and now she loves exploring kale! The garden has been a great way to safely meet others, grow our own food, and get our hands dirty over this past year. What a fun way to spend an afternoon with my cat!

Image credit: Emily Foxman; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: CSA in COVID Times

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Newton Community Farm
Publication Type
Photo

On our last late fall CSA share pickup of 2020 at Newton Community Farm, Jay Vilar, our Operations, Communications, and Events Manager, is bundled for the cold and taking precautions against COVID-19. In other years, our barn becomes like a small market inside, where 40 late fall CSA sharers pick and pack their produce, which may have been harvested by our farm manager, assistant farm manager, field crew, or volunteers. Customers mill around at their leisure and visit with other farm supporters. This year, all staff assisted in the harvest as volunteer numbers were greatly cut back to reduce exposure for staff and the community. Staff also pre-packed items like the leafy greens you see here, and put each share in a repurposed, sanitized crate. Pickups were scheduled in advance and sharers transferred their vegetables, herbs, and fruit into their bags on sanitized tables. Although this may sound like a less personal way to interact, you can see in Jay's expression the absolute joy and pride that Newton Community Farm staff felt when distributing the shares to our wonderful family of customers. The brief, warm exchanges we had with sharers were often the highlight of our week and theirs!

Image credit: Sue Bottino; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: COVID Community Get-to-know-you Gardens

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Food Council of Northeast Indiana
Publication Type
Photo

When we got engaged and decided that I would give up my place and move in with my partner, we had no idea that the world was going to come crashing down just a few short weeks later. As weeks of isolation dragged on, I decided to create these mini-gardens as a way to meet the neighbors. These were assembled over a few weeks, with little notes introducing me as their new neighbor and suggesting some uses for the assorted starts. We went for a couple of walks, dropping them off on doorsteps and porches throughout the neighborhood, where the responses ranged from bewildered to enthusiastic.

Image credit: Stephanie Henry; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Curbside 3-5

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Bmore Community Food
Publication Type
Photo

JC Faulk, founder of Bmore Community Food, strikes a pose at their weekly Saturday giveaway. BCF began in March as a COVID-19 response. With passionate volunteers and dedicated leadership, it has grown into one of the largest food rescue and distribution efforts in the city. The mission? End food insecurity in Baltimore, says JC‚ "We're still just touching the tip of the iceberg of hunger in Baltimore. That we have so many people hungry in this city, while we are throwing away so much food. It makes no sense to me". Through community drops, curbside giveaways, and a city-wide delivery network built from the ground up, BCF is currently distributing about 100,000 pounds of food a month. They plan on drastically increasing that number in 2021.

Image credit: Eli Herrnstadt; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: El hambre no tiene que ser un secreto (Hunger does not have to be a secret)

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Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance (SANA)
Publication Type
Photo

We know that hunger doesn't discriminate, but it affects everyone differently. The Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance (SANA) works alongside community members to connect them to culturally appropriate food assistance and to develop solutions that are rooted in equity. The hunger problem is bigger than ever, but it does not have to be a secret.

Image credit: Soira Ceja; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Farming during wild fire season

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21 Acres Center for Local Food
Publication Type
Photo

Anthony and Emily from the 21 Acres farm crew were beyond exhausted in this image. They're still wearing their respirators after a long day on the farm. It was cover crop week, and that meant all hands on deck to seed the rye vetch mix despite the heavy smoke from West Coast wildfires blanketing the region. A favorite staff person donated the lawn chairs so that the team had a place to crash near the wash pack station at the end of each day.

Image credit: Jess Chandler; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Food Security Meets Get Out the Vote

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Madison Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

One volunteer readies bags to provide food assistance to low-income residents of Madison while another tucks in information about how to register to vote and how to cast an absentee ballot. The Madison West High Area Collaborative is an all-volunteer organization that operates as a food relief program to help address the widespread food insecurities exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. School staff [and other volunteers] work directly with families to identify needs and make sure there is enough food and support from our Collaborative for each family each week. All of this is done in partnership with Westminster Presbyterian Church, Second Harvest Food Bank of Southern Wisconsin, and United Way of Dane County.

Image credit: Steve Ventura; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Fresh Food Box

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Community Action House and Ottawa Food
Publication Type
Photo

When COVID-19 began to affect our region in Western Michigan, we began to be inundated with produce from local restaurants and producers. Through our food council, Ottawa Food, we were able to start a Local Farmers Relief Effort, which raised funding to purchase directly from our smaller farmers in the area who needed extra support. Our food program would receive about 1,000 lbs of produce weekly, which was packed into our fresh food box. Every household who came for our curbside assistance received a fresh food box, which had dairy and frozen items along with the local produce, and recipes or tips on how to use the fresh items. The work through our council not only supported our small, local farmers but provided for our neighbors who were receiving fresh, healthy options. Already this year, we've been able to provide half a million meals through our food distribution, and all through collaborative efforts like this one!

Image credit: Chara Bouma-Prediger; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Grow & Glow

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Mill City Grows, Inc.
Publication Type
Photo

In the midst of a global pandemic, our Lowell community asked how they could help. Mill City Grows' volunteer program was relaunched, volunteers picked up shovels, and school gardens were rejuvenated!

Image credit: Maggie Nowak; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Feeding Pueblo Local

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Pueblo Food Project
Publication Type
Photo

Pueblo Food Project has spent the last year making hunger relief a priority. Through the pandemic, like most communities, we were hit hard. Our Coordinator, Monique, put an emphasis on local food and hunger relief. PFP bought local food from Pueblo farms, ranchers, and every food business that we could connect with, which has helped stimulate the local economy and has given our community much-needed fresh and good food. The event pictured was a drive-through neighborhood bash, which is a staple in our community (though different this year.) This year we were invited to contribute meals to families. That day we were able to provide over 300 families with meals. Some received turkeys, others received locally made tamales, and everyone received cookies from a local bakery and a bag of potatoes. Over the past year we have been able to feed a couple thousand families and individuals in our community.

Image credit: Megan Moore; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Growing Together

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Poughkeepsie Farm Project
Publication Type
Photo

My 2020 food system looks like a community growing together. I spent the fall of 2020 as a Community Education Intern at the Poughkeepsie Farm Project in New York's Hudson Valley. While lending a hand to the farm crew harvesting carrots, I came across an intertwined pair that managed to grow together. To me, it looks as though they are hugging. In the current climate, a sense of togetherness can be rare, but it is something I found volunteering at an urban farm. Not pictured here is a group of volunteers who took time on a cold fall afternoon to minimize food waste and help support a local not-for-profit. In these carrots, I can see a cooperative food system growing together, intertwined with justice and joy.

Image credit: Olivia May; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Heavy Lift

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Johns Hopkins University
Publication Type
Photo

Volunteers sorting and packing emergency food bags for Johns Hopkins employees in need.

Image credit: Christine Grillo; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest. 

Photo: Little Goyret & Maters & Food is Free

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Northwest Tennessee Local Food Network
Publication Type
Photo

As the pandemic grew, so did Sofia and Marco's relationship with each other. They also realized that the food we grew from our family garden could help others who needed food. They would gather cherry tomatoes throughout the growing season and help bag them up to then drop them off at our little free food pantry in our community for others to enjoy.

Image credit: Samantha Goyret; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Oopsy

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Newman Catholic Schools
Publication Type
Photo

We are a small, private school in north central Iowa. We have never taken part in any farm-to-school activities in the past. This year, we received a grant from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship made possible through the CARES Act. This allowed us to buy local, farm fresh products. It makes perfect sense when about 90% of Iowa's land is devoted to agriculture! Carrots, potatoes, radishes, lettuce, tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, and yogurt were some of the produce served this year. As you can see in the photo, it made a beautiful plate of food.

Image credit: Julie Udelhofen; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Pandemics and Plastic Packaging: School Meals in 2020

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FoodCorps Americorps
Publication Type
Photo

In 2020, school meals look a little different. School cafeterias are constrained by packaging requirements, staffing shortages, delivery procedures, and safety measures. At Tracey Magnet School, an elementary school in Norwalk, Connecticut, all students are eligible to receive free school meals every day. Our cafeteria staff works hard to make sure nothing gets in the way of that.

Image credit: Meghan Hadley; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Returning to the earth to return again

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Philadelphia Seed Hub
Publication Type
Photo

A photo of a neighbor's compost pile in Mount Airy, PA. I was coming out of a meditation when I saw this. In my meditation, I was focusing on the early winter landscape and the bareness of it. Then, when I finished meditating, I looked to my left and saw this bounty. The contrast was beautiful to see. Seeds, food, and land are still resilient in all of this.

Image credit: Dagmar Holl; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.