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Food Policy Resources

Please contact Anne Palmer at apalmer6@jhu.edu or Karen Bassarab at kbanks10@jhu.edu if you are looking for specific materials.

Showing 41 - 60 of 418 results

Photo: Splitting hives

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Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Colorado State University
Publication Type
Photo

In this photograph, a beekeeper is demonstrating the process of splitting a bee hive into two. This involved a discussion about prior safety and precautions, when and how to split a hive, the nature of bee colonies, locating the queen bee, and following up in the next few weeks to ensure that the colony is healthy and on path to produce honey! COVID-19 made the provision of agricultural extension services more crucial than ever, as well as more challenging to deliver the services. This photograph is from the Archuleta county in Colorado, where beekeeping demonstrations were done for the local community as something that could be practiced in one's yard to even a larger scale operation. The use of visual media in the form of photographs and videos has been of immense help in the dissemination of many such programs.

Image credit: Pratyoosh Kashyap; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Uplifting

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San Luis Valley Local Foods Coalition
Publication Type
Photo

Local foods and art were literally "uplifted" in the form of this stunning hand-painted sign done by farmer & artist CaRi ConaRi and her companion, Tom Robinson, pictured here. Summer of 2020 marked the Farm Stand's grand opening on-site at the Rio GrandeFarm Park, located right at the entrance of Alamosa. The burst of color, seen from the highway, is a welcoming beacon to travelers and locals alike. Open three days a week, the Farm Stand provides additional opportunities for farmers to sell produce and for members of the community to access fresh food outside of the Farmer's Market. The organic goods aren't only for cash-paying customers; farmers were reimbursed through a Farm-to-Pantry grant for delivering their leftover crops to organizations serving low-income individuals. Run by community volunteers and the farmers themselves, the Farm Stand was an interface between the buyer and the grower; it offered a mutual transaction with connection, love, and spirit at a time when the community needed it most.

Image credit: Liz Marron; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Veggie Goodie Bags

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Good Food Collective
Publication Type
Photo

Look at that veggie-enthused smile! COVID-19 has brought on numerous challenges in the realm of food and agriculture that at times seem too daunting to face. Nonetheless, food system actors continue to persist, innovate, and do what they do best: feed people. While working for the Good Food Collective as an AmeriCorps VISTA member, I quickly learned how to view gaps in the system as opportunities for collaboration that may ultimately result in a strengthened food system - as was the case with our Roots of Health Employee Foodshare Program. This program provided hospital employees with weekly shares of vegetables supplied by local farmers who were grappling with COVID-induced collapses in market channels.  Fran, pictured above, dedicated her time as a volunteer for three months by assisting with veggie distribution days, which quickly became my favorite part of the week. I handed out fresh, local food to eager and thankful frontline healthcare workers while reading poetry, discussing aspirations, telling stories, and learning about life with this fiercely compassionate human whom I now consider a dear friend. Amid all the chaos and hardship associated with 2020, let this photo serve as a testament to the undeniable value of human connection and good food.

Image credit: Falon McGinty; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Whole World in the Palm of My Hand

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Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior
Publication Type
Photo

For the majority of 2019, in addition to raising my three children, I worked at Eight Mile Creek Farm in Westerlo, NY. Eight Mile Creek Farm is owned and operated by Pam Shreiber. Pam raises grass-fed beef, chicken, and pigs, selling products at a farmers market downstate as well as providing protein options in her local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Eight Mile Creek Farm is also an organic vegetable farm. While working for Pam in her greenhouses and vegetable field, I learned and performed all tasks required to take vegetables from seed to table. My physical efforts were often done independently, offering space for self-reflection and personal growth. Braving all kinds of weather, I gained strength and appreciation for the farming lifestyle. I was blown away by Pam's dedication and unwavering strength. I myself enjoyed the bounty provided by the land and love of Eight Mile Creek Farm. After beginning my position with NYS DOH, coordinating the Just Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables Program, I was able to support Eight Mile Creek Farm and reap the benefits of my CSA membership in 2020. I will forever be grateful for this catalytic experience.

Image credit: Clare DiSanto; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2020.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

In-store interventions to encourage healthier purchasing: What we can learn from the supermarket industry

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Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
Publication Type
Webinar

Supermarkets sit at a critical juncture and play an important role in determining how and what food we buy. During this Edible Inquiries discussion, Dr. Allison Karpyn and Darya Minovi discussed how supermarkets use placement, promotion, and price to induce impulse purchases of unhealthy foods and how similar strategies can be used to nudge healthier purchasing. What does the current research tell us about the effectiveness of shelf tagging, product placement in the store, and taste testing? And what are effective retail policies at the state and local level that communities can pursue to create a food retail environment that supports healthy eating?

Presenters: Allison Karpyn and Darya Minovi

Wasted Food Measurement Study: Oregon Households

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Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
Publication Type
Report

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality worked with Portland State University's Community Environmental Services to conduct a five-part study on wasted food generation in the State of Oregon. The Oregon Wasted Food Study tracked wasted food in both urban and rural households—using quantitative and qualitative research methods—to increase our understanding of how much, what, and why food is discarded by Oregonians. The main research objectives were to understand the causes of waste, collect reliable data on wasted edible food, and provide basic methods for establishing wasted food baselines and assessing shifts in waste prevention behaviors or levels of awareness.
 

Created by Christa McDermott, Debi Elliott, Laura Moreno, Cameron Mulder, Reed Broderson

Photo series: Advocate. Reflect. Vote.

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Hall Hunger Initiative
Publication Type
Photo

Dayton has been hard hit by grocery store closures in low-income areas. Instead of begging the big companies to stay, the community took the lead and is building a worker-owned, community-controlled co-op grocery store.  These photos are from the Annual Membership Meeting.  Upon proof of membership, each person receives a green and red card. Throughout the evening, various options are debated and then put to a vote of the members. Decisions aren't made in New York by looking at a spreadsheet; they are made in a community center looking at the neighborhood. The Hall Hunger Initiative proudly supports Co-op Dayton, the lead organization bringing a community-run grocery to the people. We're not building a grocery store; we're building a movement!

Image credit: Mark Willis; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Batter Up!

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LiveWell Mason County Community Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

The community ‚ Eat a Rainbow, garden in Ludington, Michigan engages youth ages 4-7 years old in gardening activities throughout the summer. LiveWell Mason County Food Council has supported this effort for two years, engaging in a collaboration between the Lakeshore Food Club and MSU Extension. As a sustainable community effort, additional garden beds were added this year, and students were able to donate produce to the food pantry twice. This is an exciting programming effort because children help plant, tend, and harvest this garden. They learned where food comes from and what creates a healthy plate. Even as young children, they begin to realize that they have a food voice that can impact not only their family but the community where they live. Often, there were surprises waiting in the garden. American historian, Alice Morse Earle said, Half the interest of a garden is the constant exercise of the imagination.  When tomatoes and zucchini are growing out of control, and they seem to double in size overnight, children use their imaginations to consider other possible uses for these amazing garden creations. Together, we giggled in excitement, admired our harvest, and one student piped up, Baseball anyone?

Image credit: Kendra Gibson; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: But We Were On a Roll!

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Pittsburgh Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

The Pittsburgh Food Policy Council has been working on the Greater Pittsburgh Food Action Plan for nearly two years and is getting very close to completion. After completing a several month-long community engagement process, our staff were hard at work analyzing the data that resulted and trying to determine what themed roundtables would round out our Plan. After puzzling over this for a good while, we landed on an approach that we felt was sure to work; aligning sectors from our State of the Food System report with the themes that emerged from our community engagement sessions and then identifying roundtable topics that complimented and filled in the gaps. It was perfect!

But only until we realized that our hardworking scribe was using a permanent marker on the dry-erase board! After a quick photo was snapped Sarah and Karlin got busy furiously trying to clean the whiteboard. And once the dust settled, we spent a bit of time determining who might have mixed a permanent marker in with the whiteboard markers. We're looking at you, Dawn.

Image credit: Mariama Badjie; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Cooking Up Change

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Montgomery County Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

In 2019, the Food Council's Policy Committee created a Licensing Subcommittee to evaluate and address the licensing and regulatory requirements that pose a barrier to culinary educators and instructors, non-profit organizations, and food businesses interested in conducting food demos or sampling. Our subcommittee was comprised of approximately 15 community stakeholders whose business or organization was impacted by the requirements. After four meetings, the group collected research and input to understand the challenges created by the existing regulatory environment, and also assessed the requirements for food businesses and non-profit organizations in neighboring counties, to create a list of recommendations, which were presented by Food Council representatives to the County's Department of Health and Human Services. We will be working with members of the County Council over the next few months to propose legislation that will ease the financial and logistical difficulties related to securing a temporary food service license and farmers market permit. We expect that our efforts will enable dozens of businesses and organizations throughout the County to more easily provide food education to residents, promoting increased nutritional health and a bolstered food economy in Montgomery County.

Image credit: Catherine Nardi; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Feed the Pig!

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Montgomery County Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

Throughout 2019, Food Council staff, Council Members, and partners visited Montgomery County Public Schools which have implemented exemplary wellness initiatives that encourage students to make healthier, more conscientious choices. We created a School Wellness Communications Campaign to highlight these schools through our blog and social media, promote a celebration of existing and evolving school wellness initiatives, and encourage schools throughout the County to adopt similar programs. Oakland Terrace Elementary School was the first school featured in the campaign; among the wonderful wellness initiatives at the school is a large school garden. The various gardens within the courtyard, including a colonial garden, sensory garden, woodland garden, and salad science garden, each serve a different purpose and parallel the classroom curriculum so that students can continue their learning in a different environment with a unique lens. The garden also features a composting system, so that students can learn about environmental sustainability and reducing waste. The Food Council's Environmental Impact Working Group is currently engaged in promoting in-school composting efforts, in partnership with County leaders and the County's Department of Environmental Protection, and will continue highlighting the schools that are exemplifying sustainability and wellness measures similar to those at Oakland Terrace.

Image credit: Catherine Nardi; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Food Policy Councils in Action

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Capitol Area Food Policy Council, Michigan Local Food Policy Council Network
Publication Type
Photo

The Michigan Local Food Policy Council Network hosted a series of webinars to prepare our membership for our first Legislative Education Day. On this day, food policy councils from across Michigan came together in Lansing to advocate and educate their elected officials on their favorite programs and food systems issues.

Image credit: Vanessa Garcia Polanco ; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Growing Seeds, Tending Hearts

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Lake County Community Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

In Michigan, Lake County has 18% of its residents reporting food insecurity. Grand Oaks Nursing Center, MSU Extension, and the Lake County Community Food Council had a shared vision of creating garden beds for Grand Oaks residents and staff. Four community beds and three wheelchair-accessible beds were installed in the facility's patio area. The administration explored best food safety practices for preparing the produce and received approval to be able to offer garden-to-table experiences for these seniors. Even though residents don't get to choose their meals, these gardens evoke positive memories of gardening, canning, and family meals. Glen, a Grand Oaks resident, spent time daily watering and weeding the plants. He asked staff to prepare fresh salads made from the tomatoes and greens that he helped grow. He shared how much he loved the garden and that it gave him something to look forward to. Looking back, our original goal was food security, but this project has also reminded us about the emotional health benefits of growing a garden. British biographer Jenny Uglow reminds us that we may think we are nurturing the garden, but of course, it's our garden that is really nurturing us.

Image credit: Christine Engels; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Mobile Education Kitchen

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Franklin County Food Council, Pearl Farmers Market
Publication Type
Photo

To promote healthy and local foods available at the farmers market the Ohio State James Mobile Education Kitchen provided cooking demonstrations on the last Friday of every month at the market. Every day, 150-375 people sampled new recipes as they watched the prep on the truck's television, received recipe cards with that day's meals, and got a Pearl Market tote to encourage spending at the market!

Image credit: Sam Sharkey; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: PA Farm Bill Advocacy at the Capitol

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Pittsburgh Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

In 2019, PA Governor Tom Wolf proposed a package of bills (the PA Farm Bill). These proposed bills allocated much needed resources in a variety of areas. Most notably, it included the first state-level allocation of funds specifically for Urban Agriculture projects. This component of the proposal included $500,000 to be distributed in mini-grants and larger, collaborative infrastructure projects. The Pittsburgh Food Policy Council (PFPC) organized a number of advocacy efforts to gather support for the bill; held and live-streamed an info-session with a representative from the State Dept of Ag, council members contacted various state representatives to express support for the bill and facilitated discussions among PFPC member organizations to develop collaborative proposals. When the bill was passed, the PFPC sent a delegation to the Capitol for the signing ceremony. This photo shows our delegation of Karen Gardner (National Young Farmers Alliance), Hannah Smith-Brubaker (Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture), Dana Harris-Yates (PFPC Urban Ag Working Group Co-chair), Dawn Plumer (PFPC), Karlin Lamberto (PFPC) smiling big in front of the Capitol. Side note: Once the bill was approved and the Urban Agriculture Infrastructure grants were awarded Pittsburgh and Allegheny County organizations were awarded 19% of the 500K.

Image credit: Karen Gardner; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Stop Buyin' It

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SPACES in Action-DC Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

On October 8, #DontMuteMyHealth leaders, ambassadors and partners held a press conference on the steps of the D.C. Council building to introduce the Healthy Beverage Choices Act of 2019, a sugary drink tax effort designed to combat the negative health impacts of sugary drinks on communities of color in the District. The 30 gallons on the steps represent the amount of sugary beverages that an average child drinks in a year.

Image credit: LaDon Love; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Sunflower Salutations!

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Franklin County Food Council, Pearl Farmer's Market
Publication Type
Photo

To promote the Pearl Market, Sam (the market manager) dressed up as a sunflower to hand out flyers two times a month during the summer. She definitely got some stares walking around downtown Columbus, OH as a flower pot, but it put a smile on everyone's face!

Image credit: Franklin County Food Council, Peal Farmer's Market; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Teach Em Young 2019

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Ottawa Food
Publication Type
Photo

Ottawa Food implements a Produce Donation Program at local farmers markets, where shoppers are encouraged to purchase extra produce and donate it to community members in need. This little boy brought a donation of blueberries when his grandmother (Ottawa Food member) was collecting donations at the Holland Farmers Market. Afterward, he decided to have his own free produce stand at home!

Image credit: Deb Ralya; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: The Dirt on Food Policy

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Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association
Publication Type
Photo

This soil was made from yard and kitchen debris diverted from the urban waste stream and was used to educate community members on how to produce their own fresh, healthy and organic food. Everybody wanted to know what was going on with the wagon. Then they enjoyed the tomatoes.

Image credit: Susanna Dzejachok; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Two Girls and a Goat

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NWI Food Council
Publication Type
Photo

Our photo was snapped on one of our FarmHop farm tours in September 2019. For the past three years, our food council has organized a series of farm tours of local, family farms in our region to allow the public a chance to see what small farms really look like and get to know the people who grow our food. Raising awareness in the general public about the needs of our farmers is a daunting task and requires excellent storytelling, consistent messaging and above all, an opportunity for consumers to emotionally and personally connect with producers.  Through the FarmHop tours, we've increased year-round local farmer sales and facilitated valuable business connections (including peer-to-peer mentoring between farmers!). On evaluations, 100% of FarmHop guests reported that they would attend again and that the experience has changed how they view and value food. The two little girls in this photo (Teagan on the left, Frankie on the right) just finished milking Red, an alpine goat, at The Pioneering Pig Homestead. Sandy was particularly fond of Frankie and leaned in to give her a goat kiss, and we captured Frankie's sweet little recoil and Teagan's amusement.

Image credit: Anne Massie; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2019.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.