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Food Policy Resources

Please contact Anne Palmer at apalmer6@jhu.edu or Karen Bassarab at kbanks10@jhu.edu if you are looking for specific materials.

Showing 121 - 140 of 418 results

Photo: Mr. Chin Dines al Fresco

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United Way of New York City
Publication Type
Photo

Local Produce Link (LPL) is a New York State Department of Health Hunger Prevention Nutrition Assistance Program (NYSDOH HPNAP) grant-funded initiative that connects regional farmers with food-insecure communities in New York City. Using the community-supported agriculture model, 9 farmers make weekly deliveries during the growing season to provide fresh produce to food pantries in the five boroughs.

Designed with the hub-and-spoke concept, one food pantry serves as the hub host, receiving 4-6 shares of vegetables during the June- November season. The host keeps a vegetable share while the hub's participating member food pantries pick up the remaining shares to distribute it to clients as part of a balanced food package. An important distinction of LPL is that the vegetables delivered are not gleaned or rescued; the farmers are all contracted with grant funds to grow crops for these pantry communities.

Another unique aspect of the program is the relationship-building that occurs between the pantry communities and the farmers who grow their food. There are annual farm trips when LPL staff invite pantry staff, volunteers, and clients as a group to visit the farms located in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to learn about responsible growing practices directly from their farmers.

This image was captured in July 2017 during the trip to the Farm at Miller's Crossing in Hudson, New York. Following a picnic lunch, farmer Chris Cashen provided a tour of his acreage, including fields planted with cabbage, kale, cauliflower, and corn. Guests were invited to pick ears of corn right from the stalks, and Chris encouraged everyone to try it right there. Here, Mr. Tin Chin is enjoying doing exactly that! This was the first time he had eaten raw corn. He shared, "It popped like popcorn". 

Image credit: United Way of New York City; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Pittsburgh Food Policy Council

Publication Type
Photo

Pittsburgh Food Policy Council staff & interns connect with concertgoers at Farm Aid's Annual Homegrown Village. Attendees were asked to write a message to elected officials on paper plates, providing a visual representation for our legislators to understand constituents' concerns on issues ranging from protecting SNAP to supporting our local farm community.

Image credit: Dora Walmsley, Pittsburgh Food Policy Council; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Raw Milk and Cookie Rally at the FDA

Publication Type
Photo

I attended a rally at the FDA where individuals brought in raw milk from PA (where its legal) to Maryland for the rally. Homemade cookies were also passed around and shared with the protesters and the police. The police chuckled and said they couldn't accept, but some laughed and said they grew up on raw milk. It was a peaceful rally full of good cookies, raw milk, and good cheer. Protests can be playful to make a point.

Image credit: Food Passion Project; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Savi Horne

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Forsyth Community Food Consortium
Publication Type
Photo

Ingenuity - Savi Horne for her innovative and longstanding  work around advocacy and activism

Image credit: Marcus Hill, Forsyth Community Food Consortium; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: School Farm Tasks

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The Food Project
Publication Type
Photo

Food policy change happens in our schools, communities, and backyards. Understanding the food system demands taking an active role in it and listening to the people most impacted by its shortcomings. It involves care, slowing down, and weeding around the wash station.

Image credit: Amanda Chin, The Food Project; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Sharing the Bounty

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Ottawa Food
Publication Type
Photo

Ottawa County is one of the top-producing agricultural counties in the state of Michigan and one of the most diversified ag-producing counties in the nation (second only to California). Unfortunately, however, not all Ottawa County residents have access to this fresh, healthy, local food. The Ottawa Food Produce Donation Program was designed so farmers market shoppers could purchase extra produce to share with their neighbors in need while supporting local growers. In this picture, grateful senior citizens are selecting from some of the donated produce during the summer of 2017.

Image credit: Jessie Riley, Ottawa Food; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Tackling Food Waste

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Philabundance
Publication Type
Photo

Philabundance, a Feeding America food bank serving 5 counties in Pennsylvania and 4 counties in Southern New Jersey, is working with PA State Senator Daylin Leach on food waste reduction policies. This photo was taken after Senator Leach and his staff participated in a Philabundance gleaning program at the Philadelphia Wholesale Produce Market (PWPM). They, along with other volunteers, picked out 21,000 pounds of perfectly good produce that would otherwise have gone to waste but will now go to people in need. The Senator and his team were able to see first-hand how much good food unnecessarily goes to waste, and we discussed what types of policies could be introduced to help reduce food waste and hunger at the same time. We are grateful to the Senator and his team for their interest in this issue and for agreeing to get their hands dirty!

Image credit: Stefanie Arck-Baynes, Philabundance; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: The Best Tomato of Her Life!

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United Way of New York City
Publication Type
Photo

Local Produce Link (LPL) is a New York State Department of Health Hunger Prevention Nutrition Assistance Program (NYSDOH HPNAP) grant-funded initiative that connects regional farmers with food-insecure communities in New York City. Using the community-supported agriculture model, 9 farmers make weekly deliveries during the growing season to provide fresh produce to food pantries in the five boroughs. Designed with the hub-and-spoke concept, one food pantry serves as the hub host, receiving 4-6 shares of vegetables during the June- November season. The host keeps a vegetable share while the hub's participating member food pantries pick up the remaining shares to distribute to clients as part of a balanced food package. An important distinction of LPL is that the vegetables delivered are not gleaned or rescued; the farmers are all contracted with grant funds to grow crops for these pantry communities. Another unique aspect of the program is the relationship-building that occurs between the pantry communities and the farmers who grow their food. There are annual farm trips when LPL staff invite pantry staff, volunteers, and clients as a group to visit the farms located in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to learn about responsible growing practices directly from their farmers. This image was captured in August 2017 at Golden Earthworm Farm in Jamesport, New York. Following a picnic lunch, farmers Matt Kurek and Maggie Wood provided a tour of their acreage, including fields planted with peppers, eggplant, and tomatoes. Fatimah was thrilled to pick this tomato, cradling it like a precious gift!

Image credit: United Way of New York City; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: The Farm Bill Train

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Detroit Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

How to communicate the complexity and interconnectedness of the farm bill? We came up with the idea of a train. This allows us to show different ways the titles are connected, how some are bigger than others, and how the bill can pull together or go off the rails. 

Image credit: Amy Kuras, Detroit Food Policy Council; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: The Youngest at the Table

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Rhode Island Food Policy Council
Publication Type
Photo

Vanessa Garcia Polanco, 21, and Eliza Cohen,25, the youngest members of the RIPFC, meet with their elected officials in Washington DC for the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group Youth Advocacy Day (NESAWG). The two young advocates are thankful to the Rural Coalition and NESAWG, which were the sponsors of this unique opportunity to talk about RI food and agricultural issues. 

Image credit: Rhode Island Food Policy Council; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Photo: Together We Can

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Community Food Strategies
Publication Type
Photo

Representatives from 28 food councils in North Carolina and numerous partners from NC, VA, GA, and SC joined hands in appreciation and gratitude for each other inequitable food and farm policy work at the 2017 Statewide Food Council Gathering in North Carolina. We convened to learn from, connect with, and inspire each other.

Image credit: Marcello Cappellazzi, Community Food Strategies; CLF Food Policy Networks Photo Contest, 2017.

By downloading this image, you agree to use the photo within the context that it was taken. You also agree to never use it for commercial purposes. The image always belongs to the original photographer and should be attributed to the photographer and Center for a Livable Future Food Policy Networks Photo Contest.

Increasing Healthy Food Access through Grocery Stores and Healthy Corner Stores

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The Food Trust
Publication Type
Webinar

This webinar shares lessons learned by national experts who have financed grocery store development and other healthy food retail in low-income urban and rural communities, and community-based grassroots organizations that have provided technical assistance and resources to small stores to help them sell healthy food.

Presenters: Sajan Philip, Juan Vila, Shamar Hemphill, Mary Elizabeth Evans

Designing Public Participation: Managing Problem Settings and Social Equity

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Public Administration Review
Publication Type
Article

Researchers suggest that inequity and disparities in public participation in the policy-making process will go hand in hand unless public managers and community leaders are attentive to these concerns when they are designing participation opportunities. Previous research has considered how the design of participatory opportunities can address inequity, but it has provided few insights into what is behind design choices. This article provides a theoretical framework that links public managers' and community leaders' perspectives on their own political efficacy and sources of their efficacy, yielding four types of "designers."

Authors
Jill K. Clark

Healthy Food Service on Local Government Property

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ChangeLab Solutions
Publication Type
Brief

This model healthy food service policy provides language for a local policy enacting food service guidelines that set standards for the sale or provision of food and beverages served and sold on local government property. In addition to vending machines, this policy covers other food establishments including concession stands, cafeterias, and food provided at meetings and events.

State Policy: Healthy Food Service on Government Property

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ChangeLab Solutions
Publication Type
Report

This model healthy food service policy provides language for a state policy enacting food service guidelines that set standards for the sale or provision of foods and beverages in food venues served and sold on state property. In addition to vending machines, this policy covers other food establishments including concession stands, cafeterias, and food provided at meetings and events. 

Ohio Food Policy Network: Mapping the vision for the future of Ohio's food system

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Ohio Food Policy Network
Publication Type
Report

The report documents findings from nearly 18 months of data and information gathering to understand who we are and what we can accomplish together, a process that began with the 2016 Ohio Food Policy Summit. The purpose of this “Map” is to describe the OFPN, the people in the network, and our shared goals to drive network activities in the future.

Created by Amy Baskes, Jill Clark, Amalie Lipstreu, Andy Wapner

Maine Food Sovereignty Law

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State of Maine
Publication Type
Policy

"An Act to Recognize Local Control Regarding Food Systems, legitimizing the authority of towns and communities to enact ordinances regulating local food distribution free from state regulatory control."

From Field to Capitol: Farmers as Advocates

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Chesapeake Foodshed Network & Johns Hopkins Center for Livable Future
Publication Type
Webinar

This Chesapeake Foodshed Network food systems webinar showcased a panel of three food and farm coalitions/councils enacting direct advocacy & farmer engagement. Panelists represented West Virginia Food & Farm Coalition, Johnson County Food Policy Council, and Rural Vermont.

Presenters: Spencer Moss, Michelle Kenyon, Graham Unangst-Refenaccht, Andrea Stander

The Good Food Purchasing Program: The Nitty Gritty

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Center for Good Food Purchasing
Publication Type
Webinar

This webinar is intended for Good Food Purchasing Program local coalitions and national partners and covers highlights regarding Chicago's GFPP city-wide adoption; nitty gritty details of GFPP implementation, commitment and assessments, cost, and updated standards, and a brief overview of communications resources available to local coalitions and national partners.

Presenters: Colleen McKinney, Rodger Cooley and Christina Bronsing-Lazalde

Tools for Assessing Economic Impact: A Primer for Food Systems Practitioner

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Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems
Publication Type
Webinar

This webinar is intended for food system practitioners interested in commissioning an economic impact assessment. It offers an introduction to the concept and provides an overview of different tools to assess economic growth. Speakers cover both standard commercial models and alternative, community-based approaches. The webinar includes an example of an economic impact assessment underway for the craft beer industry, highlighting the lessons learned so far.

Presenters: Megan Phillips Goldenberg, Ashley McFarland, Kathryn Colasanti